UDW caregivers are strong advocates for our IHSS clients – seniors and people with disabilities. That’s why every year we sponsor and support legislation that will protect and improve the IHSS program as well as the quality of life for IHSS providers and our clients. We also support legislation that promotes social justice and improves the lives of working families in our communities.

 

by Zak Mustapha, The Huffington Post, September 6, 2016

Taking care of children during their early years is simply one of the most fulfilling phases and foundations of being a parent. On the other hand, it can be rewarding as a career more so if one considers cases where both of the parents in the family are working. These kind of parents do not only need good care, security and safety to be given to their children, but also proper education to be provided to their growing children.

Also, the need for childcare professionals is greater today than in the past times. As teachers continue to retire, the rate of enrolment has tremendously increased hence there is a continuous need for quality childcare providers. Parents consequently have recognized that a solid foundation is directly connected to their children future educational growth and success. This, therefore, makes highly trained child care providers the need of the hour.

The following are some reasons anybody should consider taking a course in childcare for a successful career as childcare worker:

1. The joy and fun experienced

Hearing the voices of the children and seeing their faces lighting up with fervour each time they learn something new undoubtedly brings boundless joy. Remember childcare professional make the children’s day worthwhile. Also the time spent with the children allows a person to experience a first-hand child’s transformation. As a childcare worker children can be helped to develop into healthy and happy little people.

2. Increases employments prospects

As one advance in the childcare industry, there are diverse opportunities in the industry. After working in the childcare career one can be taken on as a childcare centre manager. It also makes it easy for a person to set their own day-care business. There are many childcare courses that are now available in various higher institution of learning. If one receives a nationwide renowned qualification from college, their chances of being considered for greater tasks in the industry increase. This

3. It’s a reliable source of steady income

For people looking to secure a stable source of income, studying to qualify in childcare is helpful in obtaining the requisite knowledge and skills required to work as a childcare professional.

4. Flexible working hours

This could be one of the major reason why many people may end up choosing a career in childcare. This career allows one to choose when to work according to their chosen programme and availability. Essentially, a profession in childcare is the furthermost appropriate job for people with children and may want to pursue another career to earn extra income for the upkeep their families.

5. It is a well sought after career

With the notable increase in demand for qualified childcare workers, taking a course in childcare becomes a competitive edge in the industry. While taking the course, a person gains the necessary skills and knowledge required in the industry, hence becoming an appropriate candidate for the employers. The qualification becomes a substantial proof of proficiency in the industry. Remember childcare workers are requisite instruments to a child’s growth.

6. Sharing knowledge and experience

It also brings an indescribable joy to support new parents. Just figure out a parent calling and expressing how happy they are for what their children have learnt from. It really would melt one’s heart with gladness. Having such impact and outcomes in the learning process of kids are rare privilege.

Still thinking whether to take a course as a childcare worker? Well, there are some of the reason why one should now take it.

By Clyde Weiss, AFSCME, August 19, 2016

State map of percent change in child care worker median wage, 2010-2015 (Early Childhood Workforce Index 2016)

State map of percent change in child care worker median wage, 2010-2015 (Early Childhood Workforce Index 2016)

The need to make child care more affordable for families has been an issue in the Presidential race. But not enough attention has been given to the people – mostly women – who provide that care. That’s too bad, because nearly half of the nation’s child care workers are in families that receive food stamps, welfare or other federal support, according to a new report.

Researchers at the University of California-Berkeley found that, last year, 46 percent of child care providers lived in families enrolled in at least one of the social safety net programs: SNAP (food stamps), TANF (welfare), Medicaid or the Federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). That compares with slightly over a quarter of the total U.S. workforce that is enrolled in such programs.

These providers – an “almost exclusively female workforce,” according to the researchers – earn a median hourly wage of just $9.77. That’s less than a janitor is paid, on average. “Nationally, child care workers are nearly in the bottom percentile (second) when all oc­cupations are ranked by annual earnings,” the report said.

“Our nation relies on their knowledge and skills to provide high-quality early care and education to our increasingly diverse popu­lation of children and families,” the authors wrote. “Yet our system of preparing, supporting, and rewarding early educators in the United States remains largely ineffective, inefficient, and inequita­ble.”

Without a change in state and federal policies that address this issue, they added, “our nation will remain unable to deliver on the promise of develop­mental and learning opportunities for all children.”

The authors – led by Marcy Whitebook, director of the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California-Berkeley – recommended several strategies to improve child care worker compensation, including identifying ongoing sources of funding “to ensure sustainable raises in base pay, in order to substantially improve the economic circumstances of early educators and to ensure the ability to attract and retain a skilled workforce.”

It will take political willpower to increase the wages of child care providers, but the consequences of not doing so may be felt by the next generation.

“We’re entrusting children to people who are really struggling to feed their own families,” said Whitebook in an interview about the report in the Washington Post. “They’re managing all this stress, which is distracting to all the important work they have to do.”

It’s at the state level where the changes must be made. “State policies play a powerful role in shaping early childhood jobs and, in turn, the qual­ity of early learning experiences available to young children,” the report notes.

AFSCME, which represents thousands of child care workers nationwide, supports state initiatives to raise child care compensation. In California, UDW Homecare Providers Union/AFSCME Local 3930 is working with state lawmakers to raise subsidy rates for family child care providers who earn, on average, just $4.98 per hour after accounting for expenses, according to the coalition, “Raising California Together,” of which UDW is a member. Higher rates will make it “easier for them to afford their work-related expenses and keep their day cares open for business,” wrote UDW Exec. Dir. Doug Moore in a recent column on our blog.

“These problems add up to decreased access to quality, affordable child care and early learning opportunities for our children,” wrote Moore, also an AFSCME International vice president. “But there is a solution: Make an investment in family child care providers to increase families’ access to child care.”

Hillary Clinton, AFSCME’s endorsed candidate for President, is committed to raising wages for America’s child care workforce. “Hillary will create the Respect and Increased Salaries for Early Childhood Educators (RAISE) initiative,” her campaign website says. “In line with Clinton’s Care Workers Initiative, RAISE will fund and support states and local communities that work to increase the compensation of child care providers and early educators and provide equity with kindergarten teachers by investing in educational opportunities, career ladders, and professional salaries.”

AFSCME will work to elect Secretary Clinton so she can carry out her pledge to the nation’s child care workers. They – and the next generation – depend on her.

For Immediate Release 

June 27, 2016

Contact: Mike Roth, 916.444.7170

Sacramento, CA – The Raising California Together Coalition released the following statement from Co-Chairs Tonia McMillian, family child care provider, and Clarissa Doutherd, a parent and ‎Executive Director at Parent Voices Oakland, on the budget agreement signed into law today that will invest $527 million in early learning and care for children and support for working parents in the state’s lowest-paying jobs:

“California took a huge leap forward for our kids today with the repeal of the Maximum Family Grant rule and investments in early learning that will pay dividends for generations. California’s early educators, parents and advocates are proud to have fought side-by-side through Raising California Together to improve child care quality and access and make early learning for California’s kids and support for working parents and the child care workforce a priority in this budget.

“Early learning is one of California’s best anti-poverty programs, and the significant, ongoing investment announced today will enable both child care workers and the parents they support to lift their families out of poverty.

“The Governor and legislative leadership have sent a strong and clear message that after years of neglect, California will no longer ignore an achievement gap that divides our kids into haves and have-nots before they even start kindergarten.

“But our fight to build the type of child care system that is worthy of all our children is far from over. Raising income eligibility and continuing to invest in quality care for infants and toddlers is critical to ensuring parents can maintain access to child care and for providers to be able to keep their doors open. We must also keep fighting to expand affordable child care until every growing girl and boy has access to a quality early learning experience each deserves, regardless of background.”

Raising California together, a coalition of child care workers, agencies, parents, educators, clergy and interfaith networks, unions, small businesses, women’s and children’s advocates, community groups, and public health organizations united to press for local, state, and national policy solutions to increase access to quality child care and early learning choices.